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Improving Employee Satisfaction: First the Bad News

Improving Employee Satisfaction: First the Bad News.

I love statistics. In just a few words and numbers I often see meaningful data which I can use to write posts like this.  Statistics reveal that employee satisfaction is at an all time low. Statistics that corroborate this statement and also show the damaging effects that poor employee satisfaction can cause your organization include:

  • Only one in three employees is actively engaged at work. (Blessing White)
  • The lost productivity of actively disengaged employees costs the U.S. economy $370 Billion annually. (Gallup)
  • In February, June, and October of 2010, the number of employees voluntarily quitting surpassed the number fired or discharged. (US Bureau of Labor Statistics)
  • 78% of engaged employees would recommend their company’s products or services against just 13% of the disengaged. (Gallup)
  • 86% of engaged employees say they very often feel happy at work against 11% of the disengaged. (Gallup)
  • Less than 50% of Chief Financial Officers appear to understand the return on their investments in human capital. (Accenture)
  • 75% of leaders have no engagement plan or strategy even though 90% say engagement impacts business success. (ACCOR

So let me sum up all of these statistics for you.  Employees aren’t having a good time at work, it’s costing their companies beaucoup bucks as a result, and despite this many leaders are doing little about it.

Here are a few more statistics for you.  In a poll of 1,800+ U.S. employees, only 14% felt their company’s leaders were ethical and honest and only 12% believed their employers genuinely listened to and cared about their employees. (Maritz Research)  Ouch!

The unemployment rate is the highest it has been in decades and yet in 2010 you had employees voluntarily jumping ship into the icy waters of unemployment rather than toil another day for captains they mistrusted and whom they felt took them for granted.

So what is the solution?  Well, the way I see it many organizations have hit rock bottom.  That’s the bad news.  The good news for them is that they can only go up.  In my next post I will discuss a few changes that employers can make to dramatically improve their employee morale, which will in turn lead to higher profits.

Ryder Cullison

Hire-Intelligence LLC

About The Author

Ryder Cullison

Ryder has more than 10 years of experience working with retained search clients as a search professional. As a pioneer of Interview4 he has great knowledge of video interviewing. He writes about all things hiring and looks forward to engaging with his audience on topics of leadership, recruiting, candidate screening, and employee satisfaction. Follow him on Twitter: @hireintelligent and @cullison1

9 Responses to “Improving Employee Satisfaction: First the Bad News”

  1. October 4, 2011 at 3:29 pm

    Fantastic post. Some good points you highlight in there.

  2. November 20, 2011 at 2:12 pm

    I’d love to follow you on RSS but I can’t seem to find the button.

    • admin
      November 22, 2011 at 1:39 pm
      • April 2, 2012 at 1:28 am

        If you will be handling money at all, some will not hire you due to the fact, you may skim some off for your own debts. Usually they are oonkilg at it for that reason, but also as a signal of your character. For some jobs, it makes sense to use a report, for others, I think it is just a way to narrow the field of a gazillion applicants these days.

        • July 4, 2012 at 11:45 pm

          This is so well said: engaged emlyopees stay for what they give and disengaged emlyopees stay for what they get . I think that the kind of culture that will feed sustainability for the future now is one that cultivates leadership capability at all levels. To do that people in positions of leadership must learn to source their power by empowering others rather than claim power based on their position.

    • April 1, 2012 at 5:47 am

      Bad credit ceniiatds all types of stuff for a potential employer. If you’re in dire straits, you may skip town or move back in with your parents. If you can’t make commitments to creditors, will you show up to work every day? If you make late payments, will you show up to work late? It sounds funny, but it’s true. It’s a measure of responsibility, like anything else.A person with good credit is essentially more responsible than someone with poor credit, any way you slice it.

      • July 3, 2012 at 5:01 am

        If you will be handling money at all, some will not hire you due to the fact, you may skim some off for your own debts. Usually they are oolknig at it for that reason, but also as a signal of your character. For some jobs, it makes sense to use a report, for others, I think it is just a way to narrow the field of a gazillion applicants these days.

      • July 5, 2012 at 1:43 am

        With regards to depneovilg people, we have to learn how to give feedback. A lot of managers fail at this and only rely on formal reviews for feedback. Clearly state what an employee did well so that she can replicate it, and also, clearly state any mistake so that she can fix it.

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